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Madison healthcare workers train for disaster in Alabama

Madison healthcare workers train for disaster in Alabama

Imagine a small group of domestic terrorists attacking local infrastructure, leading to injuries and death, a disruption of daily life and instilling fear among area residents.

It's a scenario most people don’t want to think about, but 140 personnel from 37 healthcare and hospital facilities across Wisconsin recently dealt with that scenario during an intensive, week-long training program at the Center for Domestic Preparedness in Alabama.

The center provides emergency responders with the skills they need to respond to and manage incidents and is funded by the Federal Emergency Management Agency. This allows participants to attend at no cost to their employers.

St. Mary’s Hospital sent four employees from its emergency preparedness committee to participate in the experience where attendees received extensive training related to their professions before coming together for the simulated terrorist exercise. 

Slow/no wake ordered for 2 Dane Co. lakes

Slow/no wake ordered for 2 Dane Co. lakes

Dane County officials declared a slow/no wake order for two Dane County lakes, according to a release.

Dane County Executive Joe Parisi and Dane County Sheriff Dave Mahoney have signed a declaration calling for a slow/no wake order on Lake Monona, including Squaw Bay, and Lake Waubesa, according to the release.

Officials said recent heavy rain and flooding have increased lake levels and the order is being issued due to the potential for additional rainfall over the next 24 hours.

Under the slow/no wake order, boats must move as slowly as possible while still maintaining steering control and produce no wake, according to the release.

The order is in effect now through at least Monday, according to the release.

Officials said violators may be subject to citations or fines, and signs will be posted informing lake users about the order.

UW grad honors dad with 85-mile biking fundraiser

UW grad honors dad with 85-mile biking fundraiser

A University of Wisconsin graduate will channel his dad's love of biking and push pedals for a good cause in mid-June.

"My idea has always been to be like my father," Donald Malchow wrote on his blog. "I was thinking of ways to do so and make him proud."

Fittingly, Donald Malchow is calling his 85-mile ride planned on June 15 from Milwaukee to Madison, "Bike Like Mike."

Ironman triathlete with diabetes to speak downtown

Ironman triathlete with diabetes to speak downtown

Despite being diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, Jay Hewitt pushes his body to its limits.

As an Ironman triathlete and member of the U.S. National Triathlon Team, Hewitt is living proof that an active lifestyle is possible for those with diabetes and helps keep the disease under control.

On June 6, Dean Clinic, St. Mary’s Hospital and the American Diabetes Association invite residents to listen to  Hewitt tell the inspirational story of how he became the first athlete with type 1 diabetes to qualify for the U.S. National Triathlon Team. He'll also discuss how he learned to manage his disease and become a world class competitor, both of which he said require discipline and proper nutrition.

"I respect my diabetes, but I will not surrender to it,” Hewitt said.

Organizers said the event is free and open to the public.

The event begins at 6:30 p.m. at the St. Mary's Hospital Conference Center, Bay 1.

This event is presented by Novo Nordisk.

Cardiac arrest survivor wants others to learn life-saving skill

Cardiac arrest survivor wants others to learn life-saving skill

Survivor: '[I was] clinically dead, and I was that way for 20 minutes'   

Sudden cardiac arrest kills 1,000 people a day in the U.S., which is roughly one person every two minutes.  Would you know what to do if you saw someone collapse in front of you?

Channel3000.com and WISC-TV are proud to partner with St. Mary’s Hospital on Saturday for Hands on Hearts -- a community-wide event offering free compression-only CPR .

COCPR is a hands-only technique to help those in sudden cardiac arrest. The constant compressions are performed 100 times a minute to the center of a patient's chest. The compressions keep oxygen-rich blood flowing to the heart and brain. Mouth-to-mouth rescue breaths are not needed.

When compression-only CPR is used on a victim of cardiac arrest, the chance of surviving increases greatly.

Road salt lingers in Madison’s watersheds, drinking water

Road salt lingers in Madison’s watersheds, drinking water

Report: Decades of salt use causes chloride levels in watershed to rise   

Every winter, George Dreckmann, the public information officer for the Streets Division, faces numerous complaints from the public about bad road conditions, asking the department to use more salt in their communities.
 
"It is our policy to not apply salt to residential streets to protect our lakes and groundwater," responded Dreckmann to one resident's complaint via e-mail.
 
The road salt, also known as sodium chloride, doesn’t simply vanish after winter.

State offers safety reminders for daylight saving

State offers safety reminders for daylight saving

It's almost time to spring forward, and Wisconsin officials are using the occasion to remind residents about home safety.

Daylight saving time begins Sunday, when Wisconsinites will set the clocks ahead one hour. Safety officials said the event marks a convenient reminder to do annual checks.

For example:

  • Consider replacing the batteries in smoke detectors and carbon monoxide detectors
  • If you don't have an emergency kit at home, now's the time to get one
  • If you do have an emergency kit, put fresh batteries in the flashlight and make sure the food, water and first-aid kit are all in good condition

The Wisconsin Department of Military Affairs has additional safety tips on its website.